takeovertime:

Oak Kitchen Concrete | Rainer Spehl

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rubyetc:

sorry not sorry

rubyetc:

sorry not sorry

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rubyetc:

true story

rubyetc:

true story

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"

There seems to be an assumption that if you’re offended by movie brutality, you are somehow playing into the hands of the people who want censorship. But this would deny those of us who don’t believe in censorship the use of the only counterbalance: the freedom of the press to say that there’s anything conceivably damaging in these films - the freedom to analyse their implications.

If we don’t use this critical freedom, we are implicitly saying that no brutality is too much for us - that only squares and people who believe in censorship are concerned with brutality. Actually, those who believe in censorship are primarily concerned with sex, and they generally worry about violence only when it’s eroticized. This means that practically no one raises the issue of the possible cumulative effects of movie brutality. Yet surely, when night after night atrocities are served up to us as entertainment, it’s worth some anxiety. We become clockwork oranges if we accept all this pop culture without asking what’s in it. How can people go on talking about the dazzling brilliance of movies and not notice that the directors are sucking up to the thugs in the audience?

"

Excerpt from Pauline Kael's “Stanley Strangelove” from The New Yorker, January, 1972.

Episode 3 – Basketball to the Future feat. Shaun Hatton

wordburglar:

Kick off your weekend with this one! This episode I’m joined by the one and only Shaun Hatton (EP Daily, Reviews on the Run, Cybertronic Spree). Enjoy! 

This show, you guys!

(Source: contac, via rarecultcinema)

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